Maxentius

Maximianus 286 – 305 & 306 – 308 & 310 A.D.

One of the members of the Tetrarchy, Maximianus had a convoluted reign that started when he and Diocletian began ruling as equals in 286. Maximianus was in charge of the western portion of the empire along with Constantius I, his junior in command, while Diocletian and Galerius ruled the eastern half. After several years of putting down revolts and usurpers, both he and Diocletian abdicated to let their Caesars take their place in 306. However, this peaceful arrangement would come to an end soon when Maximianus's son Maxentius initiated a revolt of his own. Seeing that it would lend an air of legitimacy...

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Maxentius 306 – 312 A.D.

The tale of Maxentius is one of the more convoluted accounts of any Roman emperor. It all started when some years before Diocletian came up with his Tetrarchy scheme. Together with Maximian, both were to be Augusti ruling jointly with each overseeing half of the empire. Each in turn named a Caesar as right-hand-man and would succeed the emperor when the latter died. Maximian was the father of Maxentius and, in other times, would have normally been Maximian's successor but the new ruling format had no place for him. When Diocletian abdicated and forced Maximian to do likewise Maxentius lost all hope....

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Licinius I 308 – 324 A.D.

Licinius was a soldier and friend of Galerius. When Diocletian effected the Tetrarchy, Galerius became emperor of the East and he named his friend emperor of the West. Licinius cohabited the west with the usurper Maxentius whom he was unable to expel; his own rival Constantine I later getting the job done. When Galerius died in 311 Licinius moved out East becoming Galerius's successor and leaving the West to be squabbled between Maxentius and Constantine. Within another year Constantine would defeat Maxentius and Licinius the usurper Maximinus Daia. From then on Licinius and Constantine would be on-again...

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Constantine I 307 – 337 A.D.

  One of the great Roman emperors, Constantine rose to power when his father Constantius Chlorus died in the year 306 while campaigning against Scottish tribes. He later went on to defeat the rival emperor Maxentius in the decisive battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. He is credited for several great landmarks in history and is probably best memorialized by the city that bore his name for hundreds of years: Constantinople. Although now renamed Istanbul, this city was to be the seat of power for all Byzantine emperors for the next 1100 years. Constantine is also remembered as the first Roman emperor...

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