Marcus Aurelius

Lucius Verus 161 – 169 A.D.

Sharing the title of Augustus with his brother Marcus Aurelius, history records Verus in a less-than-glowing light. Although an intelligent and handsome man, he didn't seem much interested in political or military affairs. Going through the motions, he followed his war generals who did the dirty work while it was noted he enjoyed a hedonistic lifestyle on the road complete with a traveling theater and frequent banquets to entertain him. It was on the return of one of these battles that he died after a stroke. Consensus holds that his greatest accomplishment was, unflatteringly enough, that he delegated...

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Faustina II c.128 – 175 A.D.

Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus. Her claim to fame, or rather notoriety, was her rampant unfaithfulness to Marcus Aurelius who, it seemed, was the only Roman who wasn't on to her. Upon her death a mournful Aurelius asked for her deification. Alarmed at the possible scandal but unwilling to test the will of the beloved emperor the Senate complied.   AU Aureus RIC 494b (Antoninus Pius), BMC 1097 (Antoninus Pius), C 19 Aureus Obv: FAVSTINAAVGVSTA - Draped bust left. Rev: AVGVSTIPIIFIL...

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Commodus 177 – 192 A.D.

Commodus vies with Caligula and Nero as Roman history's most perverse and sadistic of rulers. Like Caligula and Nero before, Commodus was an ordinary (by imperial standards) ruler who succeeded Marcus Aurelius, his father, upon his death. In his one major positive deed, Commodus called off the expedition against the Germans which his father had commenced on terms favorable to Rome. He sped off to Rome where he much preferred living the perks of an emperor to the dirty business of waging wars. While he whiled away his time pursuing a hedonistic lifestyle he was happy to delegate administrative responsibilities...

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Marcus Aurelius 161 – 180 A.D.

Marcus Aurelius owes much of him becoming Augustus to Hadrian who groomed him from childhood for the post. He became Caesar shortly after Hadrian died and the political grooming continued under Antoninus Pius. He had to wait another twenty years or so to become Augustus himself in the year 161. No sooner did this happen than he was thrust in a series of wars that would eat up the rest of his time in office. He died while fighting the ever-harassing tribes of the Germanic region and power then passed to his son Commodus. During his lengthy reign he is remembered as being among the noblest and most...

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Annia Faustina ? A.D

Third wife of Elagabalus and great-granddaughter of Marcus Aurelius. Her brief marriage to Elagabalus accounts for the extreme rarity of coins bearing her name. It is unclear when she died and under what circumstances as the divorce, although no fault of her own, sent her into obscurity, if not a worse fate. AE Sestertius RIC 399 (Elagabalus), C 2 Sestertius Obv: ANNIAFAVSTINAAVGVSTA - Draped bust right. Rev: CONCORDIA - Elagabalus and Faustina holding hands. $9,537 11/20/00.  

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