Gordian I

Gordian III 238 – 244 A.D

When the revolt of Gordian I & II in Northern Africa failed the Senate appointed Pupienus and Balbinus as joint emperors. However, this choice proved to be so unpopular that the Senate sought and found the grandson of Gordian I and named him Caesar so as to give an air of a dynastic lineage. Balbinus and Pupienus were murdered soon after leaving the teenage Gordian I as sole emperor. Gordian III then spent the next several years in relative obscurity participating in various wars. He was killed by agents of his Praetorian Prefect, Philip, who had ambitions to become emperor himself. AU...

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Gordian II 238 A.D.

Gordian was the son of the father of the same name. He led a hopelessly outclassed militia army against a Roman legion headed by Capellianus and died in battle. AR Denarius RIC 1, BMC 19, C 5 Denarius Obv: IMPMANTGORDIANVSAFRAVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: PROVIDENTIAAVGG - Providentia standing left, holding wand over a globe, cornucopia in left; left elbow resting on short column, legs crossed at ankles. March - April 238 (Rome). $2,500 1/13/03. RIC 2, BMC 28, C 12 Denarius Obv: IMPMANTGORDIANVSAFRAVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: VICTORIAAVG...

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Gordian I 238 A.D.

Gordian came from an influential Roman family and had served in several high-ranking posts. He was appointed Governor of Carthage and some years into his duties a serious tax revolt erupted because of the drastic taxing Maximinus was imposing to fund his war machine. The elderly Gordian saw that the revolt would culminate in his own death unless he took action. In a life-saving marketing move he came across as the friend of the people and equally disgusted with the situation and was named emperor. The Roman Senate went along with this since they much preferred him to Maximinus. Although he made...

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Balbinus 238 A.D.

Balbinus was one of the two nominees to the transfer of power following the disappointing crushing of the revolt led by Gordian I and II. As they were both chosen by the Senate to protect their own interests, both the Praetorian Guard as well as the public in general found the decision intolerable. Instead, they had wanted for a successor of pedigree. Understanding that gaining the support of the civilians and army was essential, they then found the teenager grandson of Gordian I and named him Caesar. Balbinus for his part had a deep mistrust for Pupienus (who felt likewise about Balbinus) and the two never...

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