Galerius

Maximianus 286 – 305 & 306 – 308 & 310 A.D.

One of the members of the Tetrarchy, Maximianus had a convoluted reign that started when he and Diocletian began ruling as equals in 286. Maximianus was in charge of the western portion of the empire along with Constantius I, his junior in command, while Diocletian and Galerius ruled the eastern half. After several years of putting down revolts and usurpers, both he and Diocletian abdicated to let their Caesars take their place in 306. However, this peaceful arrangement would come to an end soon when Maximianus's son Maxentius initiated a revolt of his own. Seeing that it would lend an air of legitimacy...

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Maximinus II 308 – 313 A.D.

The nephew of Galerius, Maximinus "Daia" was chosen as his eastern Caesar under the shaky Tetrarchy of Diocletian. He was sent to oversee Syria and Egypt where he awaited his turn at being emperor of the east half of the empire. Unfortunately for him, the western Caesar, Severus II, was defeated by the usurper Maxentius. This in turn forced Galerius to name Licinius as his replacement. Galerius died in 311 and Licinius, not Maximinus, was elevated to Augustus totally sidelining Maximinus who was the senior Caesar. Maximinus was upset about this, to say the least, but somehow or other he and Licinius...

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Licinius I 308 – 324 A.D.

Licinius was a soldier and friend of Galerius. When Diocletian effected the Tetrarchy, Galerius became emperor of the East and he named his friend emperor of the West. Licinius cohabited the west with the usurper Maxentius whom he was unable to expel; his own rival Constantine I later getting the job done. When Galerius died in 311 Licinius moved out East becoming Galerius's successor and leaving the West to be squabbled between Maxentius and Constantine. Within another year Constantine would defeat Maxentius and Licinius the usurper Maximinus Daia. From then on Licinius and Constantine would be on-again...

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Galerius 305 – 311 A.D.

Galerius started as an ordinary soldier in the armies of Aurelian and then Probus. By the time he served under Diocletian his military career had culminated with the position of Praetorian Prefect. Under Diocletian's new scheme for ruling the empire, he named Galerius as one of the Caesars in the new Tetrarchy and assigned him to the eastern half. With Diocletian abdicating soon after, Galerius automatically became Augustus himself. The rest of his reign would be taken up fighting the power grabbing of Constantius Chlorus who, against the principles of the Tetrarchy, would start a dynasty in his own bloodline...

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