Constantius II

Nepotian 350 A.D.

On hearing of the murder of Constans and the usurpation of the title by his former general Magnentius, the citizens of Rome named Nepotian emperor instead. He was a nephew of Constantius II who, because of his very young age, escaped the massacre of his family some 12 years before. By holding out on Magnentius the city hoped to cut off key supplies while Constantius and his armies hurried from Persia to meet the threat of Magnentius. Unfortunately for Nepotian and his fellow rebels, Magnentius quickly set out to plug this loophole and was able to enter Rome with his own army and then find and execute...

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Magnentius 350 – 353 A.D.

Magnentius was one of the generals under the command of Constans. Early in the year 350 he gathered that the tide of wars was turning against the dominion of the Constantines and declared himself emperor. On hearing of the news Constans was dispossessed and took flight. He found temporary shelter in a temple he hoped would be his sanctuary. Magnentius sent a few of his men for him, tracked him down then breached the temple and murdered him. The rule of the whole western empire was now under his control. Constantius II was thousands of miles away embroiled in a difficult war with the Parthians in Syria...

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Julian II 360 – 363 A.D.

Julian was the son of Constantius Gallus and made Caesar by his own father's murderer, Constantius II. Constantius then assigned him an army and sent to suppress yet another German invasion. Upon the successful completion of this task, however, his own soldiers promoted him to the rank of Augustus. Chafing still from his father's fate he was well-prepared to meet Constantius in battle. But the battle was never meant to be because Constantius died of an illness en route and he was able to rule uncontested. Reversing the growing momentum of Christianity within the empire, Julian attempted to bring...

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Delmatius 335 – 337 A.D

Delmatius was part of Constantine's extended family, in this case one of his nephews. He was made Caesar in 335 but murdered along with several other family members shortly after Constantine died in 337 in a purge engineered by Constantius II (and presumably with the aid and consent of his surviving brothers). AU Solidus RIC 113 Solidus Obv: FLDELMATIVSNOBCAES - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: PRINCIPIIVVENTVTIS Exe: CONS - Delmatius standing left, holding vexillum and scepter; two standards to right. c.336-337 (Constantinopolis). $12,221 12/5/02. AE3 RIC 69 (Alexandria),...

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Constans I 337 – 350 A.D.

The middle child of Constantine's three surviving sons, Constans inherited the domains of Italy and the Roman provinces in Africa after the death of his father in 337. No sooner than this happened Constans and Constantine II began squabbling over who got what and the latter meant to settle the issue with his army. However, luck remained with Constans who easily appropriated all of Constantine II's former territories when Constantine died in battle; thus becoming the de facto ruler of the West. He held on to power for another ten years until the embattled Constantius II raised eyebrows within his own army...

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Constantius II 337 – 361 A.D.

Constantius joins the lenghty list of emperors whose career was marked by a seemingly endless series of wars both domestic and foreign. He served as Caesar from 324 until his father's death in 337 at which time he shared the title of Augustus with two other brothers, Constantine II and Constans. To make sure no more Johnny-come-latelies in his family would try their hand at being emperor too it is thought that he engineered a bloodbath that left nary a relative. Constantine II died in battle and Constans was murdered by the men of Magnentius, the first of several usurpers. This left Constantius...

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Constantius Gallus 351 – 354 A.D.

Gallus was one of the few who escaped the family massacre initiated by Constantine's sons in order to weed out possible future contestants to the throne. When Constantius II was unable to deal with lesser rebellions out east because more pressing issues required his presence elsewhere, he decided it would be served best if a family member was given the task. So he summoned Gallus, made him Caesar and sent him on his mission. Although he was successful in dealing with the revolts, his methods were found to be so cruel that they would likely spawn new revolts. Word of his heavy-handed manners reached...

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