Constantine

Maxentius 306 – 312 A.D.

The tale of Maxentius is one of the more convoluted accounts of any Roman emperor. It all started when some years before Diocletian came up with his Tetrarchy scheme. Together with Maximian, both were to be Augusti ruling jointly with each overseeing half of the empire. Each in turn named a Caesar as right-hand-man and would succeed the emperor when the latter died. Maximian was the father of Maxentius and, in other times, would have normally been Maximian's successor but the new ruling format had no place for him. When Diocletian abdicated and forced Maximian to do likewise Maxentius lost all hope....

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Martinian 324 A.D.

Martinian was a short-lived emperor appointed to the post to symbolically disfranchise Constantine. Constantine and Licinius met in battle with the latter suffering a resounding defeat. Licinius and Martinian fled to Byzantium. Constantine chased them both here and another battle was fought and again they were defeated. The two were captured and exiled separately where sometime later they were executed.   AE Follis RIC 16 Follis Obv: IMCSMARMARTINIANVSPFAVS - Radiate, draped bust right. Rev: IOVICONSERVATORI Exe: SMK - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe and scepter; eagle...

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Delmatius 335 – 337 A.D

Delmatius was part of Constantine's extended family, in this case one of his nephews. He was made Caesar in 335 but murdered along with several other family members shortly after Constantine died in 337 in a purge engineered by Constantius II (and presumably with the aid and consent of his surviving brothers). AU Solidus RIC 113 Solidus Obv: FLDELMATIVSNOBCAES - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: PRINCIPIIVVENTVTIS Exe: CONS - Delmatius standing left, holding vexillum and scepter; two standards to right. c.336-337 (Constantinopolis). $12,221 12/5/02. AE3 RIC 69 (Alexandria),...

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Crispus 317 – 326 A.D.

Crispus was the oldest son of Constantine. He was made Caesar in about 316 and groomed along the military and political ways to be expected of a future emperor. However, his career was cut short in 326 when his stepmother Fausta accused him of attempted rape. Her story must have sounded like an unspeakable atrocity for Constantine had his son put to death at once. Some time later it was somehow found out that she'd made up the entire story and Constantine had her literally boiled to death. Fausta's motive most likely had to do with removing Crispus from the line of succession to make way for her own sons....

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Constans I 337 – 350 A.D.

The middle child of Constantine's three surviving sons, Constans inherited the domains of Italy and the Roman provinces in Africa after the death of his father in 337. No sooner than this happened Constans and Constantine II began squabbling over who got what and the latter meant to settle the issue with his army. However, luck remained with Constans who easily appropriated all of Constantine II's former territories when Constantine died in battle; thus becoming the de facto ruler of the West. He held on to power for another ten years until the embattled Constantius II raised eyebrows within his own army...

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