Constans

Nepotian 350 A.D.

On hearing of the murder of Constans and the usurpation of the title by his former general Magnentius, the citizens of Rome named Nepotian emperor instead. He was a nephew of Constantius II who, because of his very young age, escaped the massacre of his family some 12 years before. By holding out on Magnentius the city hoped to cut off key supplies while Constantius and his armies hurried from Persia to meet the threat of Magnentius. Unfortunately for Nepotian and his fellow rebels, Magnentius quickly set out to plug this loophole and was able to enter Rome with his own army and then find and execute...

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Maximus 409 – 411 A.D.

Following the usurpation of Constantine III, Spain was caught in the difficult decision of whether to support the insurgency or remain loyal to Rome. Constantine III abandoned Britain carrying with him most of his forces to settle in Gaul so as to consolidate his power base in the region. He sent a detachment into Spain and the province readily seceded and sided with Constantine. However, the occupying forces of Constantine in Spain soon faced internal power struggles with local barbarian tribes. When word of this strife reached Constantine a delegation was sent to Spain to intervene. Gerontius,...

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Magnentius 350 – 353 A.D.

Magnentius was one of the generals under the command of Constans. Early in the year 350 he gathered that the tide of wars was turning against the dominion of the Constantines and declared himself emperor. On hearing of the news Constans was dispossessed and took flight. He found temporary shelter in a temple he hoped would be his sanctuary. Magnentius sent a few of his men for him, tracked him down then breached the temple and murdered him. The rule of the whole western empire was now under his control. Constantius II was thousands of miles away embroiled in a difficult war with the Parthians in Syria...

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Constantius II 337 – 361 A.D.

Constantius joins the lenghty list of emperors whose career was marked by a seemingly endless series of wars both domestic and foreign. He served as Caesar from 324 until his father's death in 337 at which time he shared the title of Augustus with two other brothers, Constantine II and Constans. To make sure no more Johnny-come-latelies in his family would try their hand at being emperor too it is thought that he engineered a bloodbath that left nary a relative. Constantine II died in battle and Constans was murdered by the men of Magnentius, the first of several usurpers. This left Constantius...

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Constantine III 407 – 411 A.D

Of no relation whatsoever to the Constantinian dynasty of the previous century, Constantine was a common soldier based in Britain. He was acclaimed emperor by his fellow soldiers in 407 after Germanic tribes posed an imminent threat that Rome was unwilling to deal with. It seems he then gathered these soldiers, abandons Britain and settles in Arelate. Soon after he names his son co-emperor, renames him Constans (again, to keep appearances) and sets off to consolidate and expand his territory. Constantine is then able to subdue Spain into his domain but loses it shortly afterwards when a revolt...

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Constantine II 337 – 340 A.D.

Constantine II was the oldest son of Constantine I and inherited all the Western portions of the empire except for Africa and Italy. Not content with this much he bullied his brother Constans and tried wresting these possessions away from him. When Constans had had enough and cut off communications with Constantine the elder reacted by bringing his army into Northern Italy. But Constans had anticipated these events and was well-prepared to meet him. Caught off-guard by this counter-offensive, Constantine was killed in the fight and his possessions became Constans'.   AU Medallion RIC...

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