Antoninus Pius

Faustina I c.100 – 141 A.D.

Wife of Antoninus Pius. Her death was deeply mourned by Antoninus despite widely circulating rumors of her being unfaithful to him. Her daughter Faustina II, another woman of questionable repute, married Marcus Aurelius who would also eventually go on to grieve the loss of his wife.   AU Aureus RIC 338 (Antoninus Pius), C 214 Aureus Obv: FAVSTINAAVGVSTA - Draped bust right. Rev: IVNONIREGINAE - Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; peacock to left. $1,200 5/22/02. AU Aureus (Posthumous) RIC 349a (Antoninus Pius), BMC 368 (Antoninus Pius), C 2 Aureus Obv: DIVAAVGFAVSTINA...

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Faustina II c.128 – 175 A.D.

Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus. Her claim to fame, or rather notoriety, was her rampant unfaithfulness to Marcus Aurelius who, it seemed, was the only Roman who wasn't on to her. Upon her death a mournful Aurelius asked for her deification. Alarmed at the possible scandal but unwilling to test the will of the beloved emperor the Senate complied.   AU Aureus RIC 494b (Antoninus Pius), BMC 1097 (Antoninus Pius), C 19 Aureus Obv: FAVSTINAAVGVSTA - Draped bust left. Rev: AVGVSTIPIIFIL...

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Antoninus Pius 455 – 456 A.D.

Avitus was the leading commander under Petronius Maximus and was elevated to the throne when Maximus was killed. He held on to power for almost a year before the citizens of Rome revolted over one of the now-common food shortages. Taking advantage of the unrest, the general Ricimer and his aide Majorian mutinied and Avitus fled towards Gaul, which is where his main powerbase was. However, the forces of Ricimer caught up with him and his entourage was defeated. Avitus attempted to gain sanctuary in a nearby temple but Ricimer laid siege to it until Avitus either committed suicide or starved to death.   AU...

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Marcus Aurelius 161 – 180 A.D.

Marcus Aurelius owes much of him becoming Augustus to Hadrian who groomed him from childhood for the post. He became Caesar shortly after Hadrian died and the political grooming continued under Antoninus Pius. He had to wait another twenty years or so to become Augustus himself in the year 161. No sooner did this happen than he was thrust in a series of wars that would eat up the rest of his time in office. He died while fighting the ever-harassing tribes of the Germanic region and power then passed to his son Commodus. During his lengthy reign he is remembered as being among the noblest and most...

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Antoninus Pius 138 – 161 A.D

Antoninus succeeded Hadrian once the latter's death and gained the "Pius" suffix after his goodwill in securing a Senate proclamation consecrating Hadrian. Through a combination of good luck and an even-keeled, frugal personality, he was able to pull off the most exemplary and peaceful reign of any emperor before or since. He was more interested in modernizing Roman law and its infrastructure than on waging wars of conquest. After his death he was consecrated himself and the empire started another slide into troubled times. AU Aureus RIC 14b, BMC 31 Aureus Obv: IMPTAELCAESHADRANTONINVS - Bare...

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