Coin Catalogue

Numerian 283 – 284 A.D.

Son of Carus and brother of Carinus, Numerian's brief stint as emperor started when he along with his father set out for war against the Sassanians in Persia (Iran). Under mysterious circumstances Carus was incinerated in his tent just prior to the military encounter of the two armies. The official explanation was that the tent had been stricken by lightning but this has been interpreted as much too convenient. As the battle was called off and the army was returning Numerian, too, was found dead in his quarters. This time a hasty investigation was started and the Praetorian Prefect, a certain Aper,...

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Nigrinian ? – c.285 A.D

Son of Carinus. All coins are posthumous.   AE Antoninianus (Posthumous) RIC 472 (Numerian), C 2 Antoninianus Obv: DIVONIGRINIANO - Radiate head right. Rev: CONSECRATIO - Eagle. November 284 (Rome). RIC 474 (Numerian), C 3 Antoninianus Obv: DIVONIGRINIANO - Radiate head right. Rev: CONSECRATIO - Altar. November 284 (Rome).

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Pescennius Niger 193 – 194 A.D

Niger was the governor of Syria at the time of Pertinax's murder. When he heard what had happened he decided he was the right man for the job. His soldiers quickly fell in line and off they went to Rome. A little kink in their plans cropped up when news reached them that the army of Septimius Severus had the same plans. Niger judiciously figured that his chances of defeating Severus in the open field were not good so he retreated at once back to Syria to await Severus on his own turf. Although this made things a bit more difficult for Severus, however, he was still able to defeat his rival in separate...

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Nerva 96 – 98 A.D.

Nerva's career as emperor ended less than two years after his accession to the throne. Up to that point he had been a long-time central politician under the various emperors before him, particularly Domitian and Nero. However, he started off as emperor under a precarious relationship with the army which rightly suspected him of being involved in the conspiracy against Domitian. He made things right in their eyes by presenting them with an embarrassingly apologetic speech and appointing Trajan as his successor. Trajan was at the time an admired general engaging the Germanic tribes. He died in 98 following...

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Nero 54 – 68 A.D.

One of ancient history's most infamous characters, Nero rose to power in his mid-teens following the death of Claudius, his adoptive father. To speed things along he had Britannicus poisoned and in league with his mother Agrippina had had Claudius poisoned as well. His next few years were fairly unremarkable one way or the other largely in part because of Agrippina's overbearing influence. He corrected the problem, however, by having her executed on the pretext that she had a unfavorable view of Poppaea, his new mistress. Because he was already married to a certain Octavia he had her exiled and murdered...

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Nepotian 350 A.D.

On hearing of the murder of Constans and the usurpation of the title by his former general Magnentius, the citizens of Rome named Nepotian emperor instead. He was a nephew of Constantius II who, because of his very young age, escaped the massacre of his family some 12 years before. By holding out on Magnentius the city hoped to cut off key supplies while Constantius and his armies hurried from Persia to meet the threat of Magnentius. Unfortunately for Nepotian and his fellow rebels, Magnentius quickly set out to plug this loophole and was able to enter Rome with his own army and then find and execute...

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Julius Nepos 474 – 475 A.D.

Julius Nepos rose to power at the behest of Leo, the eastern emperor. The then current ruler, Glycerius, was but a palace court appointee and puppet of a conquering barbarian general. On the approach of Nepos' army, Glycerius abdicated and was allowed to retire without bloodshed. Nepos himself was to hold on to power for barely a year before he fled another approaching army of barbarians. Although without an army, subjects or any legislative power, Nepos would linger in near anonymity in Northern Italy until he was murdered in 480 by men from his own bodyguard, possibly in a plot involving former...

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Nero Claudius Drusus 38 – 9 B.C

Drusus was an able and widely admired general and privately favored by Augustus as his successor. However, he died from an accident leaving his brother Tiberius as the most eligible candidate. He was also the father of the future emperor Claudius.   AU Aureus (Posthumous) RIC 71 (Claudius), BMC 100 (Claudius), Vagi 487, C 3 Aureus Obv: NEROCLAVDIVSDRVSVSGERMANICVSIMP - Laureate head left. Rev: No legend - Triumphal arch reading DE GERMANIS; statue of Claudius riding horse left and two trophies above. 41-45 (Rome). $5,771 12/5/02. AR Denarius (Posthumous) RIC 70 (Claudius),...

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Maximus 235 – 238 A.D.

Young son of Maximinus who was proclaimed Caesar at the same time his father was hailed as Augustus immediately after the murders of Severus Alexander and his mother. Both were killed in a mutiny prior to a battle with the forces of Pupienus.   AR Denarius RIC 1, S 2372, C 1 Denarius Obv: IVLVERVSMAXIMVSCAES - Dressed bust right. Rev: PIETASAVG - Sacrificial implements. November 235 - February 236 (Rome). RIC 3, BMC 211, C 10 Denarius Obv: MAXIMVSCAESGERM - Bare-headed, draped bust right. Rev: PRINCIVVENTVTIS - Maximus standing left, holding baton and reversed spear, behind,...

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Maximus 409 – 411 A.D.

Following the usurpation of Constantine III, Spain was caught in the difficult decision of whether to support the insurgency or remain loyal to Rome. Constantine III abandoned Britain carrying with him most of his forces to settle in Gaul so as to consolidate his power base in the region. He sent a detachment into Spain and the province readily seceded and sided with Constantine. However, the occupying forces of Constantine in Spain soon faced internal power struggles with local barbarian tribes. When word of this strife reached Constantine a delegation was sent to Spain to intervene. Gerontius,...

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